When thinking about podcasting, or getting started with the process, the all-important question eventually surfaces: how much does it cost to start a podcast?

Whether you’re strapped for cash or ready to begin with a decent amount of start-up capital, we’ll cover the general costs of podcasting for all types of budgets.

Luckily, you don’t have to spend a lot to start a podcast. Even some of the most popular podcasts stick with the basics: a microphone, computer, and recording software. However, it’s not uncommon to invest extra money for things like marketing and improved hosting.

Here’s what to expect from our guide that answers “how much does it cost to start a podcast?”

  • The suggested start-up costs and the ongoing monthly costs for podcasting.
  • Equipment needed for podcasting, and the costs associated.
  • Services used for podcasting, both required and optional.
  • The budget and best value equipment so that all podcasting budgets get what they need.

📚 Table of contents

How much does it cost to start a podcast?

It’s entirely possible to launch a podcast without spending hundreds of dollars.

However, there are advantages to opting for the better value items that enrich your sound and speed up the distribution process.

In this analysis, we cover costs to get started and manage the ongoing tasks of podcasting. After that, we’ll talk about the costs of your equipment, software, and services.

How much does it cost to start a podcast: The start-up costs

Take a look at our budget, best value, and professional cost roundups below. We even look into the costs for multi-host and interview podcasts.

Keep in mind that these costs are estimated based on current market pricing. We’ll share specific equipment and brands further down in the discussion.

The budget podcasting package
  • Microphone – $30 to $130
  • Computer – Free (if you already have one) to $300
  • Recording and editing software – Free
  • Headphones – $25
  • Podcast hosting – Free

The total for our budget podcasting package:

$55 to $455

Brand specifics

When you asked “how much does it cost to start a podcast”, you probably assumed it would be more than $55, but you only really need four items need to start recording your voice and posting it online. You may find that improvements are necessary for the future, but it’s not uncommon to begin with a simple configuration like the one outlined below.

The microphone is your primary expense. Audio-Technica, Samson, and even AmazonBasics products have microphones that get the job done for a minimal cost. Yeti sells USB microphones that get into the $100s if you’d like to take a step up.

How much does it cost to start a podcast: podcasting mics

Image: Blue

Many people already have computers. If you need a new computer or a faster processor with more storage, brands like HP and Acer sell laptops and desktops starting around $300.

There are too many respectable free recording and editing software options to consider paying for anything at this level. Go with Audacity or GarageBand.

Audacity is a free software editing option for podcasters

Although people often think headphones are optional, that’s not the case for podcasting. They’re necessary for hearing your voice while speaking into the microphone or computer.

We recommend a lower-end Audio-Technica headphone set or something comparable for around $25-$50.

As for hosting, you technically only have to upload your files to iTunes. However, you can also host your podcast for free with options like Anchor and Podbean.

Anchor offers free podcast hosting

The “best value” essentials podcasting package

The best value essentials podcasting budget is for those who have a little money to utilize and the desire to make the best sound possible, even if that means purchasing a few items that aren’t necessarily required to produce a podcast.

The “best value” essentials podcasting package
  • Microphone – $100 to $230
  • Computer – Free to $500
  • Recording and editing software – Free to $60
  • Headphones – $50 to $200
  • Pop filter or windscreen – $10 to $50
  • Recorder/mixer – $120 to $330
  • Microphone boom arm or mic stand – $30 to $70
  • Shock mount – $40
  • Cables – $50
  • Acoustic treatment – Free to $150

Total cost for the “best value” podcasting package:

$400 to $1,680

Brand specifics

As you move up in podcast quality, you can add a few elements to your equipment set.

For a microphone at this level, consider the Rode PodMic. We also like the more expensive Rode Procaster for a richer sound. Both are dynamic, professional-level mics.

mics for podcasting

Image: RØDE

Again, try to use a computer you already have or can refurbish. Otherwise, think about a desktop computer in the mid-level range, starting around $500.

The best value recording and editing software is still Audacity or GarageBand. However, many podcasters argue that Reaper has better features, and only for $60.

Reaper editing software

Our best-value headphone recommendation includes low and mid-level Panasonic, Audio-Technica, and Tascam headphones. We’d argue that you’re better off considering a nicer set of headphones at this level, so think about those brands, or even Sennheiser, at around the $150-$200+ range.

headphones for podcasting

Image: Sennheiser

You can find affordable pop filters and windscreens from Blue Microphones, Rode, and many of the random brands on Amazon.

wind blockers

Image: RØDE

A recorder/mixer comes in handy for leveling your audio for an improved sound. It’s also great for portability and recording multiple people at once. The Zoom products stand out. Start with the H1n and work up to the H4n or H6 if you want mixing and multi-user recording.

recorders for podcasting

Image: Zoom Corp

The best value microphone boom arms and mic stands come from InnoGear on Amazon. Gator Frameworks sells solid stands. Both minimize movement and mic-touching noise.

stands

Image: InnoGear

A shock mount absorbs additional noise by adding a floating, rubberband mechanism to the microphone. The big dogs like Shure and Rode sell great shock mounts, but you can also find decent options on Amazon.

Cables are needed when you graduate from a USB mic to a condenser microphone. I’ve found that the AmazonBasics XLR cables work well.

You may not need acoustic treatment depending on your room. However, it’s often essential to cover corners and hard spots in your room to minimize echoes and make your sound cleaner. Start with cheaper acoustic foam on Amazon and think about ATS Acoustics panels if you’re getting serious.

The “all-out” professional podcasting package
  • Microphone – $400
  • Computer – Free to $2,000
  • Recording and editing software – Free to $200
  • Headphones – $99 to $400
  • Pop filter or windscreen – $50
  • Microphone boom arm or mic stand – $100 to $150
  • Audio interface – $300 to $600
  • Shock mount – $40 to $80
  • Cables – $50
  • Acoustic treatment – Free to $1,000

Total “all-out” professional podcasting costs:

$1,039 to $4,930+

Brand specifics for the “all-out” costs

For the most professional microphone, think about the Shure SM7B. It’s what most professional podcasters use.

The Rode Procaster serves as a less expensive option that performs just as well.

Shure SM7B

Image: Shure

Use your current computer or spend however much you’d like to get the most RAM and storage. Apple computers, and the powerful Windows computers, get into the $2,000 range.

Recording and editing software get more expensive and powerful when you look at options like Apple Logic Pro X and Adobe Audition.

editing

When asking “how much does it cost to start a podcast?” the pros will usually factor in a very nice set of headphones.

Look for the likes of Sennheiser, Audio-Technica, and Sony.

podcasting headphones

Image: Sony

There’s not really such a thing as a high-end pop filter or windscreen, so stick to the $50 range Blue Microphones, Rode, or even on Amazon.

Top-notch boom arms and mic stands come from Rode and Gator Frameworks. They provide more stability, range-of-motion, and shock treatment.

An audio interface improves upon USB mics and portable recorders, bringing together mixing, advanced levels, and sound effects.

We like the RODECaster Pro, along with Focusrite and Behringer products. Even the Zoom H6 works as a complete audio interface – with the bonus of being portable.

audio interface for podcasting

Image: Focusrite

For top-notch shock mounts, look at Shure and Rode.

Cables are also sold by Shure, but you can find a wide range of quality brands on Amazon and at Best Buy.

Your acoustic treatment depends on your recording situation and how much you’d really like to deaden the echos. Check out ATS Acoustic and Acoustimac for top-notch panels, bass traps, and more.

Multi-host or interview podcasting costs

What’s interesting about podcasting is that there’s not really a one-size-fits-all approach to spending.

The reason for this is because podcast formats vary quite a bit, from political interview podcasts to storytelling shows, and one-host comedy shows to multi-friend podcasts that go on the road and skip the whole sitting in a room thing.

When it comes to on-the-road podcasting costs, you must figure in a portable recorder and items that you’re able to pack up and bring with you.

As for multi-host or interview costs, several mics, stands, headphones, and other elements are required. If you’re recording interviews in person, you’ll be responsible for all of those costs.

Therefore, we recommend taking the number of people you plan to have speaking on your podcast and multiplying costs for the following items by that number of people:

  • Microphones
  • Headphones
  • Mic boom arms or stands
  • Pop filters or windscreens
  • Shock mounts
  • Cables

As an example, for an interview podcast with two hosts and one interviewee, three mics, headphones, and boom arms are necessary – as well as the other items on the list.

Finally, the multi-host or interview-style podcasts usually need a good mixer or a portable recorder that records several microphones at once, like the Zoom H6 recorder.

Pro tip: If you’re using a tool like Zencastr or Skype to record podcasts in virtual space, you’ll only need to purchase equipment for yourself, but you’ll want to make sure other participants, especially your fellow podcast hosts, have a decent setup too.

How much does it cost to start a podcast: The ongoing podcasting costs

Upfront costs generally involve equipment and some software. The ongoing costs are usually required for services like hosting, editing, and the occasional monthly software.

Here’s what to expect:

The ongoing podcasting costs
  • Podcast hosting – Free to $100 per month
  • Transcription services – Free to $100 per month
  • Music and sound effects – Free to $50 per month
  • Artwork – Free to $25 per month (very rough estimate)

The brand specifics for ongoing costs

Podcast hosting services store your audio files online. Luckily, various free podcast hosting services are available, like Anchor, Podbean, and Acast. To eliminate ads and expand your storage space, we recommend looking into paid options like BuzzSprout and Castos. You can even just upgrade from services like Anchor and Podbean.

hosting

Transcription services are not only wonderful additions for listeners who are hard of hearing, but the transcribed podcast text assists in boosting your SEO. To save money, transcribe the audio yourself with Google Docs Voice typing or Headliner. Paid options include outsourcing to a human service like GoTranscript or an AI-driven solution like Scribie or Trint.

transcription services for podcasters

Music and sound effects add liveliness and story-telling aspects to a podcast. You may use music for your introduction and drop in sound effects for an older radio show vibe. Many sites, like Pixabay, offer legally free music. If you’d like a premium subscription for unlimited access to music, look into Envato Elements or Storyblocks.

music you can include in your podcasts

For podcast and episode cover art (and potentially website artwork,) we like Canva or Adobe Spark to design the artwork yourself and keep costs either low or non-existent. An alternative is to hire a freelancer or agency like PodArtwork or poke around Fiverr for a good deal.

Canva

Optional costs for podcasting

  • Advertising – $5 to $500 per month
  • Voiceover services – $5 to $500 per recording
  • A website – $3 to $100 per month
  • Editing services – $300 to $800 per month

The brand specifics for optional podcasting costs

Advertising for a podcast, if you offer a good product and have some luck, is handled by iTunes. Podcast hosting services like Anchor and Podbean also try to get the word out about the hottest podcasts. In addition to this more organic form of marketing, you have the option to spend advertising dollars on places like social media and search engines. Start with a clean design and a $5 or $10 budget through Google, Facebook, and Instagram Advertising programs. After that, refine your strategy and increase your spending if it’s working.

Voiceover services are sometimes needed to make a podcast introduction. These introductions often change based on the episode content, so it may end up being an ongoing cost. Start with Fiverr to locate highly-rated voiceover artists. You can also try searching Google for freelancers in your area.

A podcasting website isn’t necessarily required. Many big-time podcasters go without a website since iTunes and podcast hosting pages often provide somewhat of a website already. However, if you’d like to create more of a destination platform for your users – and include other pages and links to merchandise and blog posts – consider making a legitimate website. Hosting starts at around $3 per month and you can find podcast WordPress templates from SecondLine Themes or the ThemeForest marketplace.

secondline themes for podcast websites

We highly recommend against paying for editing services unless you’re rapidly scaling your podcast and making good money. It’s usually best to do it yourself or find a friend to act as your editor/producer. However, there are editing services on marketplaces like Fiverr. High-end, professional editing is also available through Podigy and Resonate Recordings.

Resonate recordings editor

How much does it cost to start a podcast: Conclusion

As you can see from the product recommendations and on-going service costs, podcasting doesn’t have to be expensive. In fact, podcasting is dirt cheap if you’re thrifty. Having said that, there are many audio aficionados and podcast professionals out there who want the best of the best.

Here’s what we found when it comes to how much it costs to start a podcast:

The absolute minimum podcasting cost
$55 – It’s even possible to cut that to $0 if you already have, or can borrow, a microphone and headphones.

The starting cost for a mid-range budget
$400 – Again there’s leeway here to save money or upgrade to more expensive equipment.

Starting cost for an “all-out” professional podcasting setup
$1,100 – We capped the “all-out” package at $4,930, but in theory, that could go much higher.

Recommended ongoing podcast costs
$20 per month – This is a good number to stick with, at least at the beginning of your podcasting journey. Take that $20 per month and spend it all on something like transcription services or artwork. Or, you can spread it out over hosting, transcription services, music, and artwork.

After you’ve handled the essentials, venture into the optional ongoing costs like advertising, voiceover services, a website, and editing services.

Finally, if you’re recording with multiple people in a shared space, you’ll have to multiply some costs based on how many hosts and interviewees you plan on having on the podcast.

What podcast setup are you most interested in? Let us know in the comments section below!

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By Joe Warnimont

Joe is a Chicago-based writer who dabbles in social media, WordPress, and eCommerce tools. When not riding his bike in Chicago he's camping in Wisconsin.

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